Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal Parish Church

Medals are an important aspect of Catholic devotion, and it’s worth exploring the topic. Since medals might be a strong and visible point of interest for very young Catholics, knowing the background of the tradition is useful.

The Value in Medals

Wearing of medals has been popular among Catholics in the United States and around the world for a long time, and it has grown more popular in recent times since Pope John-Paul II’s visit in 1979. Medals are an easy way for Catholics to connect with their faith in a discreet way, and one of the more personal aspects of medals is that they can reflect something important to the wearer—maybe you wear a St. Christopher medal if your father was a truck driver or if you were going on a long-haul flight, since he is the patron saint of traveling and transport.

So, with the wide range of medals available, they can be a good way to express yourself through your faith. Exploring the histories of the various patron saints is not only a way to explore the history of the Church, it can also make for very interesting reading!

Il Duomo di Firenze

One of the Oldest Catholic Traditions

Religious medals have been a part of the Catholic tradition for a very long time. In fact, the wearing of medals is thought to have been carried over from pagan times—the Romans of all classes wore amulets personal to their beliefs, which they believed gave them added protection. Jewelry and decoration are common to nearly every creed and religion, so it is no surprise the early Church found medals a useful way to allow the faithful to express their beliefs. The early Church elders were keen, however, to distance the practice from the magic-related pagan beliefs.

This tradition continued, throughout the early years of the Church, andmedals are mentioned in the histories of many saints and in accounts of important historical moments. They are especially associated with baptism, and many pagan kings were given medals as tokens of their baptism. However, the popularity of medals before the Middle Ages was not as strong as afterward.

During the Renaissance and Reformation eras, artistic influence on medals (with some stunning examples created) was one of the reasons for their growth in popularity. This was mainly centered in Italy, where artists such as Antonio Marescotti gave the wearing of medals new life for Popes and clergy. This was bolstered by the giving of medals to pilgrims visiting holy sites.

Modern Times

Miraculous medals are one of the more popular types, and they were designed in the 19th century based on Saint Catherine Labouré’s visions. The Chapel of Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal

in Paris is where the visions occurred. The St. Christopher medals are also very popular, and a French saying for the medals serves as an example of how they can give solace in challenging times (especially for travelers): "Look at St Christopher and go on reassured."

The medals commemorating Papal visits have also been very popular in recent times. As mentioned, Pope John Paul’s visit to America in 1979 spurred interest in the medals here.

Nowadays, there are medals for nearly every saint available, and they can be made from varieties of materials, from low-cost pewter to gold and silver. Miraculous medals are especially popular in countries like Ireland, where they are particularly associated with the Society of St. Vincent de Paul, which is, in fact, the largest charity in that country.

In many places, they are also strongly associated with sacraments and life events, in particular during confirmation.

It is wrongly believed by some that the Church frowns on the devotional practice of medals. This is not the case, and expressions of faith are encouraged if done correctly. Medals also serve as a useful way to open dialogue with other faiths about Catholic teachings.

Saint Faustina Medal with a high relief image of this Patron Saint of Divine Mercy

How Medals Fit with Catholic Belief

As with all practices and traditions, it is important to remember the act of taking part in a practice or wearing a medal is intended to bring us closer to God and help us explore our faith. It is not the act or the possession that we benefit from—instead, it is what theact or possession represents that is important.

This can be a refreshing reminder for some Catholics who can, at times, be intimidated by the examples ofdevotion of other Catholics, since focusing on one’s own relationship with God and not on external tokens of belief can really take the pressure off. Wearing medals can be an even more powerful way to express your belief. They can also bring a personal touch to your devotion.

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Our mission at Discount Catholic Products is to provide the prayer tools that help people grow closer to God. Granted, we have a vast array of items on our site, but there is a core 5 categories that I think are the most important for those who are looking to deepen their faith.

So whether you are looking for yourself or to help a friend along their own faith journey, here is our list of the 5 items every Catholic should have. But remember – the tools only work when they get used.

1. Bible – The Church encourages us to read the Bible as part of our daily prayer lives. Whether you use your bible to practice lectio divina or simply to become more familiar with the text, having and knowing your bible is important to growing your spiritual life.

2. Scapular – “Whosoever dies in this garment shall not suffer eternal fire” – the promise of Our Lady to St. Simon Stock regarding the Brown Scapular. Wearing a scapular is a prayer in itself. It is a way to show your surrender to the protection of Mary. Any Catholic can be enrolled in the brown scapular, the most common of scapulars, by a priest. Children often receive their first scapular with their First Communion.

Wearing a scapular is certainly a test of your faith and devotion when it become inconvenient or unfashionable to wear. It’s not a commitment to be taken lightly, but the promise it bears far outweighs the temporary uncomfortable moments found in our daily lives.

3. Rosary – Mary promises great graces to those who pray the rosary. By meditating on each mystery, we give Mary the opportunity to turn our eyes to her Son. We see Jesus through her eyes.

4. Crucifix – Having a crucifix displayed in your home is an indication of how your family places Christ above all else. It is a statement that you each first belong to Him, and a way to remind yourself of that very same thing.

5. Holy Water Vessel – Whether kept in your pocket, purse, car, or home, having access to holy water is important. Holy water can heal the sick, evoke graces and banish demons. You can use holy water to bless any space including your home, work and vehicle.

 

May the eyes of your hearts be enlightened, that you may know what is the hope that belongs to his call, what are the riches of glory in his inheritance among the holy ones – Ephesians 1:18

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Have you selected what to give up for Lent yet? I made my decision during Mass on Sunday, and as you can tell from the title – I’m giving up worrying for Lent. God asked me to trust Him in this week’s Gospel, and I want to give Him just that – my full trust.

The catch is that trust in Him means that I have nothing to worry about. We’ll see if I am able to keep my end of the bargain.

So in preparation for Ash Wednesday and the beginning of Lent, I need to prepare myself for the task ahead. I need a few tools to help me on this quest.

Here’s what I came up with. Please feel free to add your own in the comments section below.
1. Attend Adoration
Eucharistic Adoration can clean a whole lot of gunk out of your brain. Start by finding a way to focus by using a prayer or scripture reading. Allow yourself time to just sit and be still and listed to what God has to say.
2. Tell God about it
Empty yourself of your worrying thoughts by bringing them all to God and laying them open before Him. Hold nothing back. Tell Him everything no matter how trivial you may think it is. Use God as a sounding board. You may be surprised at what conclusions the two of you come up with.
3. Don’t try to force it out
It won’t end well. You could get caught in an ugly cycle of worrying about worrying. Give yourself enough slack to recognize that cold turkey isn’t the best way to stop worrying.
4. Exercise-Run the rosary
Nothing silences the voices in my head like exercise. That may be because I loathe exercise. I really do. I have to constantly talk myself into doing the next rep and concentrate on form. There’s no space in my brain for anything other than getting to the end of a workout. This may also be a good time to start Running the Rosary.
5. Get perspective
We have a wonderful place called The Banquet here in Sioux Falls where we can go serve meals to anyone who is searching for food or fellowship. An evening there certainly puts my worries in perspective. I know my children have a safe place to sleep and food to fill their bellies. It doesn’t mean my worries are any less worthy, but it sure sorts out the ones that are completely unnecessary.
6. Be grateful
This is really an extension of #5. All those little things we take for granted like the blanket keeping my feet warm, hot showers, and a beautiful sunset – when is the last time I took a minute to thank God for those things? What about the people who surround you like the room mom who helped organize the Valentine Party when you forgot the treats, or the priest who prayed made time for you when you needed help putting life in perspective? The list of things we should be grateful for is inexhaustible.
Forty days. Lent is 40 days and this exercise in trusting the Lord will hopefully make me a better Catholic. What are your thoughts on what to give up for Lent?

My soul rests in God alone, from whom comes my salvation. God alone is my rock and salvation, my fortress; I shall never fall.
Psalm 62:2-3

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Last week I wrote about St. Alphonsus’s “How to Converse with God”. Many of you have that book in hand by now. Have you started reading it?

I’ve had an edge of excitement for the last two weeks since I read it. This feeling is ever-present. In trying to name the source I wrote in my notebook “A deep relationship with God can change your life.” But I don’t think those words mean what I initially thought they meant.

Usually the words “change your life” invoke an idea of material difference – position, home, surroundings. We pick out the things in life we don’t like – our job, physique, financial situation — and imagine those as “changed”.

But in reality, even if all of that stuff were to remain the same and the only difference was a vastly deeper relationship with God, our lives would be different because of how it changed our hearts.

I’m a day dreamer. I like to envision my future. But I can’t tell you the last time God had any place in those day dreams. I can tell you what my ideal vegetable garden would look like, or beach vacation, but I’ve never taken the time to daydream about the most important relationship of my life.

So that’s my challenge for myself in these coming weeks: To use what I learned from How to Converse with God, make Him a part of my day dream and everyday inner monologue.

Thoughts?

A good person out of the store of goodness in his heart produces good, but an evil person out of a store of evil produces evil; for from the fullness of the heart the mouth speaks. Luke 6:45

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I’m a “follow-the-directions” type of gal. I’m a master at Ikea furniture and complicated Lego mechanisms if you give me the instructions. I like knowing the end result ahead of time and having a clear path to that goal. Put the words “How to” in the title of a book, and I’ll read it. Even if it’s something obscure that I know I’ll never do – like “How to Build Your Own Apple Press”, I want to read it.

Maybe this harkens back to my days watching Mr. Rogers’ Picture Picture videos about how to make things like candles, crayons and violins.

So when I came across St. Alphonsus Liguori’s work “How to Converse with God,” I was all over it. The book is small enough to carry with me – it can fit in a jeans pocket, but intricate enough to read over and over again.

The basis of St. Alphonsus’ book is confidence and love. It is simple, so why don’t we do it? It’s one of those habits that take time to build. But this one is majestic in its outcome and a pleasure to practice.

Below is my own summary of only a few of the wonderful parts of this book. Do not treat this list as if it were complete. The depth and breadth of the contents of this small book stand in stark contrast the petite size.

  • God loves you with the greatest love possible, and wants to be the greatest love of your life.
  • God wants you to talk to Him with confidence, because that means you trust him. To lack confidence when speaking to Him shows there is a lack of complete, confident love.
  • If you want to spend eternity with God, start now by speaking with Him as you would your closest friend – don’t be timid or cower.
  • “God is not wont to speak to a soul that does not speak to Him.” Speak to Him all the time. That inner monolog you have throughout the day can easily be turned towards addressing Him.
  • These conversations with God are not tedious or restrained. Talk about what you want to talk about. Tell Him your plans, griefs, worries, fears and hopes.
  • You will find peace by putting your confidence in God and conversing with Him regularly.
  • Beg His pardon when you sin.

Truly, I want to emphasize to you the importance of St. Alphonsus’ message in that God does not want us to talk to him with a fear so great that we cannot treat him like an intimate friend. Confidence is key.

Learn more than I can convey by reading and studying the book How to Converse with God.

And if you can’t muster the confidence, then fake it ‘til you make it.

So let us confidently approach the throne of grace to receive mercy and to find grace for timely help. (Hebrews 4:16)

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Saint Valentine is easily one of the most famous, and most misunderstood, saints within the canon of Roman Catholic priests. It’s possible he was more than one person whose stories were put together, or he may have simply moved around and let his legend follow him. Whatever the case, the story is endlessly inspiring, and Saint Valentine is worthy of a prayer and devotion this February.

Prayer to St. Valentine Card

Why Do We Celebrate Valentine’s Day?

So, why do we celebrate this odd moment in February? No one knows for sure, and there are several accounts. However, according to the legend, Saint Valentine was a priest around 280 A.D. He served under Emperor Claudius II and was a staunch Christian during a time when believers were persecuted.

However, Valentine persevered and spoke to anyone who would listen about his faith. In the meantime, Claudius needed soldiers and had a theory: if young men were single, they would fight more valiantly and be willing to die more than married men. Therefore, Claudius decided to pass an edict that no young people could marry, and he worked to bring young men into his army.

Despite Claudius’ ruling, Valentine felt that any young couple ready to take their vows should have access to a Christian wedding. He began marrying couples in secret in the Christian church. Keep in mind, this was a time when the old pagan faiths were the dominant belief system. Many people were polygamous but were drawn to the idea of being in a more simplified, monogamous couple. Many of them came to see Valentine and ask for his help to convert and, consequently, keep the young male off the battlefield.

The priest was eventually caught and jailed by the Emperor and locked up in jail for a time. His jailer, or so the story goes, had a blind daughter that Valentine grew very fond of, and the two became good friends. The jailer was dismissive of their relationship and Valentine’s faith, and, one day, he challenged Valentine to restore his daughter’s sight if his god was so powerful.

There are several versions of what happened next; some claim that Valentine prayed with his hands over the girl’s eyes and restored her vision while her father watched. Others claim the girl found she could see again after Valentine’s death. However the miracle happened, it inspired the girl and her father to become Catholics themselves.

Painting of St. Valentine

The priest Valentine was tortured throughout his stay in prison and, on February 14th, was killed and beheaded at the hands of Emperor Claudius. The day he died he wrote a letter to the jailer’s daughter and signed it “Your Valentine.” He was canonized by Pope Gelasius I in 496, and the day of his death was marked as a feast day that became associated with romantic love.

More than anything, the story of Saint Valentine is a reminder that true faith sometimes means a Catholic must be willing to break laws or even lay down their lives to stay true to what they believe. He is also there to remind us that our love, sexuality, and marriages are sacred and blessed by God, but they forever have the shadow of the cross over them and come with very real responsibilities.

Saint Valentine's Day Devotion and Prayer

Saint Valentine is deserving of prayer. Here are some devotional words to offer up this February.

Saint Valentine taught those around him how to devote their love to one another and to our heavenly father. He defied the powerful men around him in the name of the Lord our God and helped young lovers marry and express their love in the purest form possible. He died for his faith so that we might devote ourselves to those we love now, in life and without fear of persecution.

Young woman praying

Let us pray:

Oh glorious protector Saint Valentine,

Defender of marriage and true believers,

Defier of pagans and idols, I offer this prayer to you.

Help me in my marriage and in my daily battle to keep my faith,

Help me to defy doubts and forget my fears,

Help me devote my life to the Lord as you devoted yours.

Saint Valentine, I ask you to bless me in my time of need.

I will devote the 14th of February to you and hold your name in my heart.

Please help me see the truth and the way and the light.

Just as you fought for the young people who needed your guidance, draw your sword for me, carve a path for me. Forgive me for the sin of temptation and help me to leave temptation behind.

One Our Father

One Hail Mary

One Glory Be

Final Thoughts

May your February be a time of joy and celebration for the loves in your life. Remember those who fought for your freedom to love and be with the person you choose, and be sure to offer up your thanks this Valentine’s Day.

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Baptism of St. Augustine stained glass window

What Is the Cathedral Basilica?

The Cathedral Basilica of St Augustine is the oldest Catholic Church in St Augustine, Florida, as well as the seat of the Bishop of the Diocese of St. Augustine. Looking at the cathedral walls, a visitor will see adornments reminiscent of the old New World and Spain’s expansion into Florida and the Caribbean: exquisite stained glass windows and murals depicting the city’s rich history of Catholic expansion and French-British-Spanish conflict. Prominently featured is Saint Augustine of Hippo, a popular saint for whom the city was named.

For 450 years, worshipers of St. Augustine and travelers have gathered each Sunday to praise the Lord in this congregation.

Its History

Painting in basilica of St Augustine

This cathedral serves one of the oldest Catholic congregations in America. The Catholic congregation of St. Augustine was originally established in 1565, with the arrival of Don Pedro Menendez de Aviles and his four accompanying priests. St. Augustine’s first mass, as depicted above, took place on the following September 8th, the day of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary.

The original cathedral constructed in 1565 was a humble wooden structure, which had to repeatedly be rebuilt due to destruction from enemies and natural forces. In 1786, King Felipe V ordered that a new cathedral should be built. This Cathedral Basilica is designed in the Spanish mission and Neoclassical styles of the 18th century, featuring arched corridors, buttresses, terraced bell towers, wide eaves, and low, sloping tile roofs.

Construction of the Cathedral Basilica started on December 8th, 1786 and ended in 1797. Significantly, December 8th is the Feast Day of the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary. On December 8th of 1797, the cathedral was dedicated to this day. In celebration, Father Miguel O’Reilly (an Irish priest) led a procession of parishioners from St. Augustine’s Catholic parish’s bishop’s rectory to the new cathedral, carrying the Blessed Sacrament.

The Cathedral as a Minor Basilica

Technically, a basilica is a cathedral of elevated status to the Catholic Church. The Cathedral Basilica of St. Augustine was not immediately given this status. It was not until December 4th, 1976 that Pope Paul VI deemed St. Augustine’s cathedral to be a “minor basilica.” In order for a cathedral to be elevated to a minor basilica, four conditions must be met:

1) The church must have stood out as a center for active liturgy and have been dedicated to God in a liturgical rite.

2) The cathedral should be sufficiently large, including a spacious sanctuary, so that further religious celebrations can be carried out exemplarily.

3) The church must have a historical renown because it was dedicated to God in a particular historical or religious fashion, significant relics of saints are present in it, or a sacred image is venerated especially.

4) Religious celebrations throughout the liturgical year are performed in a praiseworthy manner.

The cathedral stood for 200 years before the Catholic Church formally recognized its surpassing of the above requirements.

The Beacon of Faith

Crucifix in Catholic Church

You may have seen the image of The Beacon of Faith in popular Christian media, but have not known where in the world it was or what it signified. It is the towering, 208-foot, 70-ton steel cross free-standing on the grounds of the Mission Nombre de Dios, where Menendez and his priests landed on in 1565. Although not directly at the basilica’s location, this Great Cross is a celebration of St. Augustine’s long history of Catholic praise.

Miraculously, St. Augustine has not been devastated by a major hurricane since the Great Cross was erected.

Marker of Catholic Heritage

Located in the Cathedral Basilica’s narthex is the Catholic Heritage of Florida Plaque, erected in 1999 by the International Order of Alhambra, noting how the Franciscan missionaries spread their Catholic faith throughout the region:

“LONG BEFORE THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION, CATHOLIC

MISSIONARIES FOUNDED MORE THAN A HUNDRED MISSIONS

IN WHAT IS NOW THE STATE OF FLORIDA WHERE AT

LEAST TEN MISSIONARIES BECAME MARTYRS FOR THE FAITH.

THOUGH DOMINICANS AND JESUITS WERE ALSO INVOLVED IN

PLANTING THE SEEDS OF RELIGION AND CULTURE IN FLORIDA,

THE FRANCISCANS WERE EXCEPTIONAL BECAUSE THEY SPREAD

OUT FROM THE ST. AUGUSTINE MISSION TO ESTABLISH MOST

OF THESE MISSIONS. RECOGNIZING THIS, WE HAVE ERECTED

THIS PLAQUE AND PROCLAIMED THIS CATHEDRAL–BASILICA

OF THE DIOCESE, WITHIN WHICH MANY OF THESE MISSIONS

EXISTED, A NATIONAL CATHOLIC HISTORICAL SITE.”

The Franciscans of St. Augustine were notable in traveling and spreading Catholicism to the indigenous peoples of southeastern America and the Caribbean.

Today and Now

The Cathedral Basilica of Saint Augustine is a stately edifice, with a grandeur all the public may enjoy. If you ever find yourself in the St. Augustine, Florida area, do make the pilgrimage to see “The First Parish” and appreciate its centuries-old beauty.

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“Remember that you are dust, and to dust you shall return.”

Every Catholic is familiar with this phrase. It acts as a reminder of who we are, where we came from, and why we are here. Ash Wednesday marks the beginning of Lent. For Catholics, it is the beginning of a period of reflection, modesty, and prayer. A number of enduring practices and traditions make Ash Wednesday a particularly symbolic and important date on the liturgical calendar.

Symbolism and Practice

Palm Crosses on Palm Sunday

The ashes are a sign of penance and a symbol of the dust from which God made us. The tradition of wearing ashes comes from centuries-old Jewish traditions stemming from occasions of fasting and repentance. The ashes themselves are the burned remains of palm branches from the previous Palm Sunday.

Generally, everyone is welcome to receive ashes during the Mass, even non-practicing Catholics and those who follow other faiths. Because of Ash Wednesday’s focus on renewal and preparation, it can make for a particularly powerful time to invite newcomers to the faith, as well as welcome home those who no longer practice the faith.

Fasting

As Ash Wednesday marks the beginning of the Lenten season, it also begins a period of fasting and abstinence. Barring a serious health condition, Catholics between the ages of 18 and 59 are encouraged to fast on Ash Wednesday by refraining from eating meat, including poultry. Catholics are permitted one meal on Ash Wednesday, and two smaller helpings of food that are not equal to the larger meal of the day.

Fasting continues for each Friday throughout the Lenten season. Many Catholics follow additional fasting practices by refraining from eating completely on Ash Wednesday or only permitting themselves to eat bread or water.

Prayer

Rosary Beads

Many Catholics choose to refrain from partaking in an action or eating a particular food for Lent. Kids might choose to avoid eating candy or chocolate starting on Ash Wednesday and lasting throughout the Lenten season. However, it can be far more spiritually fulfilling to add to your life, rather than subtract.

Ash Wednesday and Lent offer an opportunity to rethink your prayer life. Rather than give up chocolate, you can make a vow to pray more during the day and choose to say a full rosary each day. Use your rosary beads and choose to say a full rosary each day.

If you find yourself too busy, spread it out throughout the day, starting by saying one decade of the rosary when you wake up in the morning. By making a commitment to prayer, you can use the season of Lent to grow closer to God.

Changes at Mass

Ash Wednesday brings several notable changes to our regular Sunday masses. Beginning with Ash Wednesday and lasting through Lent, the Alleluia and the Gloria are omitted. These joyous songs return on Easter to proclaim the Resurrection. Many parishes also insert Latin phrases and hymns during Lent. This is also true of the Greek phrasing of the Kyrie. Lent is meant to be a solemn time of reflection and our mass changes to reflect this.

Reconciliation

Centuries ago, the day before Ash Wednesday was a mandatory day of penance and reconciliation. Today, many parishes offer additional reconciliation services during Lent. It is common to find community reconciliation services where parishes have several priests available to hear confessions, and a short mass is held.

This is an ideal time to grow closer together, perhaps with friends or family, by attending confession together. It may also be a good time for those with reconciliation anxiety to make it to church. Confession is required at least once a year for every Catholic.

Scheduling

Ash Wednesday is observed 46 days prior to Easter Sunday. The 40-day period of Lent is a reminder of Jesus’ 40 days in the desert. Sundays are not counted in the 40-day tally. The scheduling of Easter, and, by extension, Lent, is something that is confusing to many people.

Easter is observed on the Sunday that follows the first full moon on or after the vernal equinox. Because of this, the date of Easter changes year-to-year, which is why Ash Wednesday is also not observed on a fixed date. Ash Wednesday is not recognized as a Holy Day of Obligation.

Ashes on Ash Wednesday

However, Ash Wednesday begins our journey to Easter, a season of joy and renewal. To prepare us, Ash Wednesday and Lent serve as a period of reflection, prayer, and sacrifice. The traditions and customs of Ash Wednesday have endured over several centuries. Utilize this time to increase your devotion to prayer and grow your faith. You will get out what you put in, so focus on making Ash Wednesday a day of solemn reflection.

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This weekend our priest challenged us to not become armchair Catholics. It really struck a chord with me either because it’s always been one of my fears, or I’m already on the road to laziness.

On the last day of the Divine Mercy Novena we pray for those who are lukewarm in their faith. It’s telling that the last day is saved for the lukewarm souls as these are the ones who pain Jesus the most. “These souls wound My Heart most painfully. My soul suffered the most dreadful loathing in the Garden of Olives because of lukewarm souls. They were the reason I cried out: ‘Father, take this cup away from Me, if it be Your will.’ For them, the last hope of salvation is to run to My mercy.” (Diary, Saint Maria Faustina)

In the words of Elie Wiesel, “The opposite of love is not hate, it’s indifference.” Both love and hate evoke the color red meaning passion, fire and deep feeling. Indifference is just blah, nothing, empty.

And to be honest, being lukewarm is comfortable. It’s inside a well-cocooned comfort zone where I don’t have to confront my shortcomings or stretch my abilities.

I’m going to assume that you can relate. For me the verve with which I pursue God waxes and wanes entirely based on my own effort. I find myself practicing laziness, resulting in getting better and better at it. Instead of saying a rosary, I say a decade, then just a handfuls of Hail Marys, then later “God – you know I love you, but I’m tired and going to bed now.”

And poof. A hard-won habit is lost.

I read things like what Lis writes about her wonderful experience with adoration and my initial reaction is jealousy at her relationship with God. Seriously. I need to get over myself.

But coming in behind the jealousy is a ray of inspiration. I want what Lis has and I’m the only thing standing in my way. Or sitting in my own way – in that darn armchair Father mentioned on Sunday.

Now is the time to get uncomfortable. Through actions, learning and prayer I once again fuel the flame of love of God. There can be no waiting or excuses. “I don’t have the time” doesn’t cut it. We have one job to do in this life and that is to get to Heaven.

Time to once again role up my sleeves.

1. Learn – even on just the topic of Catholicism there is so much to discover that I won’t be done in my lifetime. Guided education through your parish or online with sites like Formed.org are a great place to start.
2. Act – Using the Corporal Works of Mercy as a starting point. If you’re more than happy donating money to help a cause, ask yourself if that’s too easy. Perhaps it’s time to nudge a little farther out of ye olde comfort zone and try something different.
3. Pray – prayer should not be boring. If you find your mind wandering or anticipating the end of a rote prayer, it’s time to use a different approach. Lectio Devina is one method. Another is just turning your stream of consciousness into a prayer. God knows all your thoughts anyway, you might as well direct them toward him.

The Amen, the faithful and true witness, the source of God’s creation, says this: “I know your works; I know that you are neither cold nor hot. I wish you were either cold or hot. So, because you are lukewarm, neither hot nor cold, I will spit you out of my mouth.” Revelations 3:14-16

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Guide to Planning a Traditional Catholic Wedding

An engagement and the planning of a wedding is an exciting time for all couples. This is also a time for couples to decide in what ways they want God and their Catholic faith to be present in the ceremony. This is the service that, for many couples, will set the tone of how their faith will be a part of their daily lives.


First and foremost, you need to determine if you are eligible to get married in the Catholic Church and, if you are, determine the next steps to take in planning your traditional Catholic wedding.

Traditional Catholic Couple

Before You Start: Are You Eligible?

Many Catholics find themselves wanting to include their faith in the ceremony that will begin the next chapter of their lives. After all, marriage is a sacrament in the Catholic faith and adhering to Catholic tradition can create a unique bond between a husband and a wife. However, before two people decide to be joined, not only legally but spiritually, they must meet some standard criteria.


While both people who are going to be married do not have to be specifically Catholic, they are required to be a baptized Christian. One partner, however, must be Catholic, and they both need to be free to marry. If you were or your partner was previously married, and then divorced, you are ineligible to be married in the Catholic Church. However, if either of you has been married and had the marriage annulled or your previous spouse has died, you can continue to move forward with your faithful marriage plans.

Alter at Catholic wedding ceremony

There are additional criteria when it comes to whom you are planning to marry. To be married in the Catholic Church, you and your partner must be of opposite genders. While this newer form of marriage of same sex couples is constitutionally legal, and members of the Catholic Church are condemned for acting in hatred toward homosexuals, homosexual marriage is not viewed as a sacramental marriage in the Church.


If you have a question about your ability to get married in the Catholic Church, ultimately it is best to consult your parish priest. He will have an excellent understanding of the criteria necessary for a sacramental marriage, and he will tell you what needs to happen if you and your partner do not meet these criteria.

Traditional Catholic Couple

So, You Are Eligible: What’s Next? The Engagement

Set up a time to meet with the priest who will perform the ceremony well in advance of the date you are planning for your wedding. There are many pre-marriage phases you must take before walking down the aisle, and you want to ensure you have plenty of time to complete those steps.


Couple completing pre-marital inventory

First, you and your partner must complete a pre-marital inventory. This is essentially a discussion with a facilitator to make sure you and your partner have talked about important issues that might arise during your marriage. You and your partner each answer the series of questions separately, and then you see whether your answers match up. Some examples of pre-marital inventory topics include parenting, lifestyle, finances, and the in-laws. A facilitator, who is likely to be the priest that is facilitating your wedding, will lead these questions.


You will need to complete some additional in-person marriage preparation steps to be able to be married in the Church. This includes meeting with the priest as a couple. This is a great way for him to get to know what your relationship is like, as well as make sure you are both there for the right reasons. It will also aid in making sure your wedding has a personal feel.


Pre-Marriage Requirements

Couples will also be required to attend a marriage preparation program, otherwise known as Pre-Cana. This can take shape in many different forms depending on your dioceses. Through this, couples will engage in thoughtful conversations about issues that might arise in their marriage, similar to the pre-marital inventory.


However, this is also a course that ensures couples go into more detail and discussion. These programs can take place online, in the form of a weekend retreat, in weekly classes, or in one daylong program. Additionally, it is suggested you complete a Natural Family Planning course. Consult your parish priest to determine what option is available to you and exact details about what is required during your marriage preparation program.


Finally, the priest will also need to see documents as part of your marriage assessment. In addition to your pre-marital inventory, you will need to provide the priest with a recent baptismal certificate. This certificate can be retrieved from the Church you were baptized in. You will also need to supply a form from the parish that states you and your partner are free to marry.


If you are intending to marry someone who is a baptized, non-Catholic Christian or a non-baptized person, or if you wish to marry in a venue that is not a Catholic church, you are required to complete a dispensation form. The local priest or Diocese who handles the paperwork will have this form. Most parishes take about a month, on average, to grant dispensation. Most routinely grant dispensation requests.

Traditional Catholic Couple

Choosing Your Wedding Date

While setting the date may seem like something only you and your partner should be concerned about, there are specific dates you will be unable to marry in the Church. It is best to know these dates ahead of time so you do not conflict with other church programs when trying to schedule your wedding date.


Calendar with date set for Catholic Wedding

There are certain Liturgical seasons discouraged for wedding ceremonies. These seasons are Lent, or the period that starts with Ash Wednesday and ends with Easter, and Advent, or the period that begins on the Sunday four weeks before Christmas and which ends on Christmas Eve. While weddings are not technically prohibited during this time, many parishes suggest you do not celebrate a wedding during a time that is for preparation and penance for an important Liturgical holiday.


Additionally, while certain days may not be off-limits for weddings according to the Church at large, there are days and times your parish may not allow weddings. It is imperative you double-check with your parish to make sure the date and time you want the church and priest for your wedding are available before you make other plans.


Finally, there are days during the Liturgical calendar that are not off limits for weddings; however, they are off limits for choosing your own readings. The days that require you to use specific readings are Sundays and Saturday evenings, as well as feast days. So, if you are set on specific readings for your wedding Mass, you will want to make sure you avoid these times.

Traditional Catholic Couple

Mass or No Mass?

While the traditional and preferred method for a marriage in the Catholic Church is performed during a celebration of the Eucharist, there are instances where couples may choose not to marry within the context of a traditional Mass. This decision is based on whether only one or both partners are Catholic.


Catholic Church alter with chalices

If you or your partner is not a Catholic, you must obtain your priest’s permission to have your wedding performed within the context of a Mass. However, since the non-Catholic partner would not be able to partake in communion, this is not generally encouraged.


If both you and your partner are Catholic, you can choose whether you would like to celebrate your wedding during Mass with the Eucharist or if you would rather have a Liturgy of the Word service. The Liturgy of the Word service is similar in style to the Mass; however, it does not include partaking of the Eucharist. While the Liturgy of the Word service is typically shorter than a full Mass, the inclusion of the Eucharist does not add significantly more time onto your service and can start your marriage on a special note. If you decide to include the Eucharist, you might want to think about how to address non-Catholic guests who may not partake of the Eucharist at your ceremony.


Consider having your priest make an announcement with an explanation or including a clarification in your program. It is ultimately up to you and your partner to determine which service is the best fit for your personality and ceremony.

Traditional Catholic Couple

Decorations and Photographers

When planning the decorations, it is best to consult your parish. However, there are some basic guidelines you can expect to follow. The general rule is you do not want your decorations to distract from the Mass or from the overall nature and structure of the church. In fact, you can use this to your advantage by heightening the natural beauty of the worship space with simple decorations while still maintaining the celebratory effect. This will enable you to cut costs on wedding decorations without sacrificing a beautifully decorated wedding space.


Madonna and Child Statue

Another thing to consider when planning decorations is what your flower girl and guests will be tossing. Consult your parish to find specific guidelines. Many parishes disallow flower girls to toss flower petals or for guests to throw rice when you and your partner leave the ceremony due to the difficult cleanup. If your parish adheres to these rules, there are other options to keep your exit festive. For instance, try giving your guests strands of ribbon to wave or sparklers to hold as you and your new spouse make your entrance into the world as husband and wife.


Many couples want to capture their special day with pictures or videos. Photographers and videographers are typically allowed in the Mass; however, they must adhere to some general guidelines. They must not disrupt the Mass, get in the way of your guests, or enter the sanctuary space. If they follow these rules, you will still have beautiful documentation of your ceremony without ruining the special significance of the service.

Traditional Catholic Couple

Music and Musicians

Most churches do not require you to use a specific band or set of music. This gives you the freedom to choose a musician with whom you have a close relationship or one who fits your style and budget.



Dancing legs at Catholic Wedding

However, there are guidelines to the type of music you can play during your ceremony. Since the songs you pick will be sung during a Catholic service, they must maintain a religious nature and honor the Lord. It is also typically recommended you choose some songs that can be sung by the musicians, as well as you and your guests, as an act of praise and prayer. Many parishes require you to send in your music choices to be approved for a liturgical service.

Traditional Catholic Couple
Catholic bride and groom dancing

Final Thoughts

While planning a traditional Catholic wedding may seem tedious and like it would be significantly more time-consuming than planning a secular wedding, a Catholic wedding has its major advantages. It is important for Catholic couples to understand that a wedding is not only about the one day your ceremony takes place but about setting you up for a committed relationship with your life partner. When couples take this into account, the strict pre-marital actions and longer service are worth the investment of time.


The Church does not make couples participate in Pre-Cana because it can but, rather, it is intended to make sure a couple is better prepared to withstand the difficult times that come along with the joys of marriage. Couples can consider this a type of pre-marriage counseling which will strengthen their relationship in a time that is often stressful for an engaged couple.

Priest consecrating the Eucharist

Including the Eucharist and the liturgy in your ceremony sets the precedent for your marital relationship being centered on Christ. This will make it much more natural for you and your spouse to continue reinforcing your relationship with each other and with the Lord through weekly Mass attendance.


Similarly, it will likely increase your drive to raise your children in the Church, which will enable you to strengthen your family and set your children up for a positive, faith-filled life. Remember, when in doubt about anything concerning planning, your parish priest is your best resource.

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