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Ok, so this isn’t a true ode in terms of all the lyrical stanza, and it really doesn’t do justice to my mother.

I love my Mom. And I know that’s not a unique thing to say, but there are those who have life circumstances where that’s not an easy or true statement for them.

I am so blessed with my Mom. Thanking God for that gift every day doesn’t seem like enough. How is it that I can live my life in a way that shows Him how grateful I am for this blessing of a mother such as mine?

The earliest memory I have of my Mom is being outside in the garden with a red bandana holding her hair back while she worked. My mom is not one to sit around. Always “doing”, and doing something for the betterment of her family.

Because of her I had a childhood full of discovery and love. I was given room to make mistakes and test my limits. Sure, there were times when I wrapped up a sandwich and sweater, tied it up in a hobo bandana at the end of a stick and “ran away” (went and sat in the woods), but I always returned home, because that’s where the love was.

Mom embodies so many values and characteristics that I admire and want to wrap into my own life. The first of these that stand out is her grit and determination to make the world a better place whether it wants it or not. Fighting against tides of indifference and outright scorn, she has fought for as long as I can remember for her community and family.

And it’s all done out of love. You don’t make the sacrifices my mother has made without deep love. And that’s what sacrifice is – love. And all of these sacrifices were done so that we (her kids) could become the best possible version of ourselves, and follow God’s plan.

My mom and Our Mother Mary share some of these same things. I bet you can find some of these in your own mother.

Our Mother Mary made many painful sacrifices for her son. At the wedding of Cana she knew that by asking Jesus to perform a miracle she was asking him to begin his ministry, and knowing who her son was and what the prophets had said, she knew his ministry would not end in a ripe old age and natural death. She knew pain was coming.

However, she had a job to do as well. God had a plan. From the moment she said “Yes” to Him thirty years before that, she consciously became a target. She was pregnant, and not by her husband. Imagine the social implications that meant for her. Think of the fear she experienced when fleeing to Egypt with her husband and infant son. The panic when Jesus was lost for three days when he was hanging out in the temple in Jerusalem after everyone else had gone home, and the utter sorrow a the Passion. (Lectio Devina is a great way to place yourself inside scripture and prayerfully explore the personal experiences in the bible)

And today as the Mother of the World, she continues her love for us by turning our eyes toward her Son. She wants us to love Him, to see what He has done for us, and to follow Him and to “Do whatever he tells you” (John 2:5).

I strive to be like my mothers. All the good things they are, the strong, determined, make-this-world-better-come-what-may drive, and turn my eyes to what they should be focused on.

And for them I am eternally grateful.

 

 

 

Header image is photo of the Innocence plaque shown here.

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In a parish hall, a catechist patiently explains to a group of adults what the Eucharist is all about. In an office, a co-worker promises to include the intentions of his colleague in the current novena he is praying. At home, a mother patiently corrects her children and tells them the importance of obedience in God’s eyes.

These are a few examples of ordinary lay Catholics who, in their own little ways, contribute to the Church’s mission of evangelization. They may not be priests, nuns or religious, but that does not stop them from sharing and living out the Gospel in their day-to-day lives. Indeed, they are fulfilling the Great Commission — Jesus’ missionary mandate to “go into the whole world and proclaim the gospel to every creature” (Mark 16:15).

 

The Laity’s Role

According to the Catechism of the Catholic Church (897), the laity is —

All the faithful except those in Holy Orders and those who belong to a religious state approved by the Church. That is, the faithful, who by Baptism are incorporated into Christ and integrated into the People of God…and have their own part to play in the mission of the whole Christian people in the Church and in the World.

The Church recognizes the importance of the laity, who make up most of the Church. In Lumen Gentium, the Dogmatic Constitution on the Church, the role of the laity is further defined:

By reason of their special vocation it belongs to the laity to seek the kingdom of God by engaging in temporal affairs and directing them according to God’s will. They live in the world, that is, they are engaged in each and every work and business of the earth and in the ordinary circumstances of social and family life which, as it were, constitute their very existence. There they are called by God that, being led by the spirit to the Gospel, they may contribute to the sanctification of the world, as from within like leaven, by fulfilling their own particular duties. Thus, especially by the witness of their life, resplendent in faith, hope and charity they must manifest Christ to others.

Because the laity is found in every sphere of society, they have a special mandate to reach out to those in their own spheres, to take on that responsibility of bringing Christ to these areas. And it does not have to be in grand ways; rather, it is so simple and doable, and yet so amazing that the laity can “contribute to the sanctification of the world” by “fulfilling their own particular duties” as mentioned above.

An article in Catholic Digest even streamlined it in three steps: “Know the Faith. Live the Faith. Share the Faith” (http://www.catholicdigest.com/articles/faith/trends/2013/04-03/what-is-the-new-evangelization).

 

Why a New Evangelization?

The term “new evangelization” was first coined by St John Paul II when he made a historic visit to Poland in 1979, proclaiming, “A new evangelization has begun, as if it were a new proclamation, even if in reality it is the same as ever.”

In his encyclical, Redemptoris Missio, he said that “the new evangelization is very much tied up with entering a new missionary age, which will become a radiant day bearing an abundant harvest, if all Christians…respond with generosity and holiness to the calls and challenges of or time.”

This new evangelization is necessary because, although many people have been evangelized in the past, the pace and culture of the modern world has been influenced and inundated with such secularism that individuals need to be re-evangelized within that context.

 

Going Forth

By virtue of Baptism, one is brought into the Family of God with the duty to further His purposes on earth. It takes a process of growth and formation, all the while being among members of the Church, drawing ever closer to the Good News — Christ Himself.

How can you take part in this great work of evangelization? Where you are already gives a clue as to how to you can live it out.

 

 

Sources:

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Every once in awhile one of our customers will request engraving that hits me right in my heart. One in particular that I still tear up over when I think about it. 

It was for her granddaughter. She bought a St. Joan of Arc medal and on the back had engraved “You’re brave too. Love G-ma.”

Ugh. My eyes are doing it again. 

I love it when we get submissions like this. I wish I had the creativity to come up with these. But as I have learned, our customers are far better at this than we are.

So I’ve decided to get a few ideas from past submissions, and I’m hoping you can help us out. I’d like to create a free guide for our customers eventually.

Below is a starting list. What would you add?

Saint

Engraving

St. Joan of Arc

You're brave too

Maximilian Kolbe

There is hope

St. Anne or St. Joseph

You are mine

St. John of the Cross

Create!

St. Thomas Aquinas, St. Edith Stein

Always be learning

Padre Pio

Pray, hope & don't worry

Mother Teresa

Spread Love Everywhere

St. Catherine of Siena

Be who God meant you to be.

St. Catherine of Siena

Set the world on fire

St. Teresa of Avila

God alone suffices

St. Francis

Sow love

St. Ignatius de Loyola

Give. Don't count the cost

St. Clare of Assisi

Love God, serve God; everything is in that

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This Sunday is Divine Mercy Sunday, and it’s a doozy of a Sunday. It completes the Easter Octave and comes with an awesome promise: “The soul that will go to Confession and receive Holy Communion shall obtain complete forgiveness of sins and punishment…. Let no soul fear to draw near Me, even though its sins be as scarlet.” (from St. Faustina’s diary – paragraph 699).

That’s huge. 

Mercy is Love. Simple formula, right? M = L

“Divine” is God, so Divine Mercy is God’s love for us, and help and blessings he extends to us because of that love.

St. Faustina is the one credited for bringing our attention to Divine Mercy and relaying to us the Divine Mercy Chaplet and Novena. She was a Polish nun who was also a mystic who experienced revelations of Jesus and kept meticulous records of these experiences in her diary. 

Even though St. Faustina lived very recently (1905-1938), Divine Mercy Sunday has been around since the very early traditions of the Catholic Church. St. Faustina re-emphasized the importance of the feast. Turns out, pretty much everyone had forgotten about it. Without Jesus’ revelations St. Faustina, Divine Mercy would not exist in its current form. By virtue of a Decree issued on May 5, 2000 by the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments, the Holy See proclaimed the Second Sunday of Easter also as Divine Mercy Sunday.

The cool parts of Divine Mercy

There are many, and it goes beyond the complete forgiveness He offers on Divine Mercy Sunday. Jesus will “pour out a whole ocean of graces upon those souls who approach the font of [His] mercy.” (Faustina’s Diary – paragraph 699).

The promises of Divine Mercy are many, and this list is not all inclusive.

  • The chaplet said by the side of a dying person allows God’s mercy to suround the soul
  • Whoever recites the chaplet “will receive great mercy at the hour of death”
  • Also for whoever says the chaplet: “It pleases [Him] to grant everything they ask of [Him] (para 1541)
  • “When hardened sinners say [the chaplet], I will fill their souls with peace, and the hour of their death will be a happy one”  (para 1541)
  • The chaplet can be said by dying sinners as a last hope for salvation (para 687)
  • Praying at the Hour of Great Mercy (3:00 pm) – “I will refuse nothing to the soul that makes a request of Me in virtue of My Passion” (para 1320)
  • By praying the novena God “will grant every possible grace to souls” (para 796)
  • “Souls that make an appeal to My mercy delight me. To such souls I grant even more graces than they ask.”
  • Anyone who venerates the Divine Mercy Image “will not perish” (para 47)

The Chaplet and Novena

The Novena is a series of prayers said over 9 days. Traditionally the Divine Mercy Novena begins on Good Friday and concludes the day before Divine Mercy Sunday, but can really be begun at any time. Each day of the Divine Mercy Novena brings a particular group of souls to God as dictated in Faustina’s revelations. They are as follows:

Day 1: All Mankind, especially sinners
Day 2: Priests and Religious
Day 3: Devout and Faithful
Day 4: Those who do not believe in God
Day 5: Those who have separated themselves from the Church
Day 6: Meek and Humble Souls, and Children
Day 7: Those who venerate and glorify His mercy
Day 8: Those in Purgatory
Day 9: Those who are “Lukewarm” – “Souls without love or devotion”

 

The Divine Mercy Chaplet can be said on a regular set of rosary beads as follows:

1. Make the Sign of the Cross

2. Optional Opening Prayers

You expired, Jesus, but the source of life gushed forth for souls, and the ocean of mercy opened up for the whole world. O Fount of Life, unfathomable Divine Mercy, envelop the whole world and empty Yourself out upon us.

O Blood and Water, which gushed forth from the Heart of Jesus as a fountain of Mercy for us, I trust in You!
O Blood and Water, which gushed forth from the Heart of Jesus as a fountain of Mercy for us, I trust in You!
O Blood and Water, which gushed forth from the Heart of Jesus as a fountain of Mercy for us, I trust in You!

3. Our Father

Our Father, Who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name; Thy kingdom come; Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread; and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil, Amen.

4. Hail Mary

Hail Mary, full of grace. The Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death, Amen.

5. The Apostle’s Creed

I believe in God, the Father almighty, Creator of heaven and earth, and in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord, who was conceived by the Holy Spirit, born of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died and was buried; He descended into hell; on the third day He rose again from the dead; He ascended into heaven, and is seated at the right hand of God the Father almighty; from there He will come to judge the living and the dead. I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and life everlasting. Amen.

6. The Eternal Father

Eternal Father, I offer you the Body and Blood, Soul and Divinity of Your Dearly Beloved Son, Our Lord, Jesus Christ, in atonement for our sins and those of the whole world.

7. On the Ten Small Beads of Each Decade

For the sake of His sorrowful Passion, have mercy on us and on the whole world.

8. Repeat Steps 6 & 7 for the remaining 4 decades

Saying the “Eternal Father” and 10 “For the sake of His sorrowful Passion”

9. Conclude with Holy God

Holy God, Holy Mighty One, Holy Immortal One, have mercy on us and on the whole world.
Holy God, Holy Mighty One, Holy Immortal One, have mercy on us and on the whole world.
Holy God, Holy Mighty One, Holy Immortal One, have mercy on us and on the whole world.

10. Optional Closing Prayer

Eternal God, in whom mercy is endless and the treasury of compassion — inexhaustible, look kindly upon us and increase Your mercy in us, that in difficult moments we might not despair nor become despondent, but with great confidence submit ourselves to Your holy will, which is Love and Mercy itself.

 

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What Are The Seven Last Words?

A loved one is nearing the end of his life. In between struggling breaths he manages to say a few words. Those who surround him lean in, making sure that each word is not spoken in vain, that each phrase is recorded in their minds, its worth and meaning embedded in their hearts. More often than not, a dying man’s wish carries much weight, and those whom he leaves behind will make sure to treasure and fulfill his final instructions.

Such is the case with Christ and His Church. While He hung dying on the cross, that Friday on Calvary, He proclaimed what is now called The Seven Last Words.” These words, based on Gospel texts, were His final statements. They serve as a guide for deeper meditation and reflection on His Passion and Death.

Many Catholics and Christians have composed their own insights on The Seven Last Words, among them Venerable Fulton J Sheen. In his book, Life of Christ, he explains:

“Our Lord spoke seven times from the Cross; these are called His Seven Last Words. In His goodness, Our Blessed Lord left His thoughts on dying. He was representative of all humanity. In this sublime hour He called all His children to the pulpit of the Cross, and every word He said to them was set down for the purpose of an eternal publication and an undying consolation. There was never a preacher like the dying Christ; there was never a congregation like that which gathered about the pulpit of the Cross; there was never a sermon like the Seven Last Words.”

(You can read his reflections here.)

 

The Seven Last Words

Here are The Seven Last Words:

  • First Word: “Father, forgive them, for they do not know what they do.” [Luke 23:34]
  • Second Word: “Truly, I say to you, today you will be with me in Paradise.” [Luke 23:43]
  • Third Word: Jesus said to his mother: “Woman, this is your son.” Then he said to the disciple: “This is your mother.” [John 19:26, 27]
  • Fourth Word: “My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?” [Matthew 27:46]
  • Fifth Word: “I thirst.” [John 19:28]
  • Sixth Word: “It is finished.” [John 19:30]
  • Seventh Word: Jesus cried out in a loud voice, “Father, into your hands I commend my spirit.” [Luke 23:46]

Jesus’ words reveal both His divinity and His humanity, His virtue of compassion alongside His feelings of abandonment, His longings and His surrender.

During Holy Week, the Seven Last Words are the subject of many sermons and retreats, as well as small group discussions. But you may also find it beneficial to meditate on these words on your own, discovering new spiritual treasures and most importantly, deepening one’s friendship with the Savior.

 

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Journey with Christ through the Stations of the Cross

Pilgrims carry a big, wooden cross — its upper, horizontal beam resting on the shoulders of those in front, and its vertical beam held by six or so hands on the left and right. It is winter, and these Catholics in heavy coats, along with those around and behind them, trace the final steps of Jesus in the old city of Jerusalem, mostly around busy, narrow streets now lined with tourist shops and some emitting the odor of a marketplace. This is the Via Dolorosa, the “Way of Suffering” or “Way of Sorrows,” the path that Jesus took from Pilate’s praetorium all the way to His tomb. The procession consists of 14 stops, now called the Way of the Cross or Stations of the Cross.

 

Origin

This popular devotion originated in the Holy Land. Tradition maintains that the Blessed Mother would make daily visits to the scenes of her Son’s Passion, and St Jerome (342-420), who lived in Israel in his latter days, confirmed that crowds of pilgrims from different countries would visit these holy places.

Many of the faithful longed to practice this devotion, but were unable to make the actual pilgrimage to the Holy Land. Thus, the Church saw it fitting to “reproduce” these sites. For example, as early as the fifth century, St Petronius, Bishop of Bologna, commissioned the construction of chapels at the monastery of San Stefano in Bologna to represent the more important shrines in the Holy Land, including several stations.

In 1342, the Franciscans were tasked as guardians of the holy places. And in 1462, an English pilgrim named William Wey described the manner by which these scenes were approached, calling them “stations.” By the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, various reproductions of the Stations could already be found in different parts of Europe. Today, the Stations of the Cross can be found in parishes all over the world.


The Way of the Cross - Stations of the Cross Book according to St. Alphones Liguori

Carry this nail token to remind yourself of Jesus' sacrifice for us.


 

The Stations of the Cross

As stated earlier, the Stations of the Cross call to mind specific scenes from Jesus’ Passion and Death. They are the following:

  1. Jesus Is Condemned to Death.
  2. 2. Jesus Takes Up His Cross
  3. Jesus Falls the First Time
  4. Jesus Meets His Sorrowful Mother
  5. 5. Simon of Cyrene Helps Jesus Carry the Cross
  6. Veronica Wipes the Face of Jesus
  7. Jesus Falls a Second Time
  8. Jesus Meets the Women of Jerusalem
  9. Jesus Falls the Third Time
  10. Jesus Is Stripped of His Garments
  11. Jesus Is Nailed to the Cross
  12. Jesus Dies on the Cross
  13. Jesus Is Taken Down From the Cross
  14. Jesus Is Laid in the Tomb.

The most popular version is the one developed by St Alphonsus Liguori, who includes a preparatory prayer, as well as prayers and meditations for each station. Also incorporated in each station is a verse of the “Stabat Mater” (a Catholic hymn associated with the Way of the Cross, which originated in the 13th century).

Various versions have also evolved in modern times, among them a Gospel-based version approved by Pope Paul VI in 1975, and another version written by Pope John Paul II.

 

Purpose

“The object of the Stations is to help the faithful to make in spirit, as it were, a pilgrimage to the chief scenes of Christ’s sufferings and death” (http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/15569a.htm).

Archbishop Piero Marini writes, “Each step of Jesus is one step closer to the accomplishment of the plan of salvation…. Every new suffering of Jesus is a seed of future joy for humanity, every jeer, a premise of glory. Along that way of suffering Jesus’ every meeting — with friends, with enemies, with the indifferent — is a chance for one final lesson, one last look, one supreme offer of reconciliation and peace…in every episode which happened on that Way lies hidden a mystery of grace, a gesture of His love for [the Church].” (http://www.vatican.va/news_services/liturgy/documents/ns_lit_doc_via-crucis_en.html)

 

Part of Your Journey

The 14 Stations of the Cross are one of the well-loved devotions of the Church, most especially during the Lenten season. They provide enriching insights and a depth of wisdom to help devotees understand even more how the Savior sacrificed Himself for their sake, and how they, too, can offer more of themselves to Him.

Make the Stations of the Cross part of your Lenten journey this year, that you may draw closer to the heart of the Suffering Servant.

 

 

Sources:

On its history —

On the Way of the Cross by St Alphonsus Liguori —

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Keeping Prayer Cards Handy
  1. Bookmark – I have my grandmother’s old St. Joseph Missal from long ago – something like 1960 or the like. She kept many holy cards in that book. I have a few in my bible that mark my favorite places.
  2. Greeting Card Insert – Whether it’s Christmas cards or Birthday cards, a prayer card is a little extra something that the recipient will hold onto long after the greeting card has been forgotten.
  3. Love Note – Just like that sticky note I like to leave for my husband every now and then, a holy card can become a love note.

4. Evangelize – Keep a stash of cards with you and when you come across someone who is struggling in their life, give them a prayer card. It will be a little bit of light during a hard time. About 7 years ago man who I held the door open for at a store handed me a prayer card. I still have it, and I still think of him to this day and say a little prayer for him. That small gesture is still fresh in my mind.

5. Reminder – Keep a prayer taped to your mirror so you can pray it every morning and night while you brush your teeth.

6. Handouts – We had a child ask for a stack of 50 St. Patrick prayer cards to hand out at his Catholic school’s Saint Museum Day project. The students dressed up as their favorite saint and would tell visitors about them. Each of his visitors went away with a prayer.

7. Commemorate an Occasion – For weddings use the bride and groom’s patron saints’ prayer cards as favors. It’s inexpensive, meaningful, and best of all prompts guests to pray for the new couple. There are prayer cards for First Communion, Reconciliation, Easter baskets, Christmas and so much more. I once gave my boss a prayer card for Boss’s Day and later saw that he had it clipped to his visor in his car  – that really made me feel valued.

8. “Thinking of You” Token – When a friend becomes ill and there is not much you can do, sending them a healing holy card lets them know that you are thinking about them and you are praying for them. 

9. Thank You Note – A quick, handwritten note in the margins of a card, or even a sticky note stuck to a prayer card adds meaning for the recipient. 

10. Keepsake – Carry your favorite prayer in your purse or pocket. One of our favorites artists has aluminum prayer cards that last forever, so no worries about wearing it out. Pick a favorite prayer and keep it with you at all times.

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The most boring way to be Catholic is to sit in the same pew every Sunday, listen to the homily, receive the Eucharist, and then change nothing. 

No one can make you change except God and yourself, but you need to be a willing participant. You need to make that choice for yourself and act on that choice. (And by "you", I mean "me" because, let's be real, these blog posts are really me talking to myself where it just so happens other people can read it.)

So when it comes to making the choice to be a very active participant and enjoy​ the richness and blessings of the Catholic faith, what are you actively doing to make sure you continue to grow? How do you keep it fresh?

Our parish, although small, has a dedicated adult education program. Even if it didn’t, I have a plethora of parishes in Sioux Falls that offer fantastic opportunities to constantly be learning. When it comes to the spiritual resources at my fingertips in our relatively small community, I’m pretty blessed.

In these classes we have covered in depth Lectio Devina, Mary, Book of Revelations, Marian Consecration, and so much more. With each class my prayer practice gets deeper and wider.

Not to say that I never fall back on old practices. Rote praying is my default, and not to say that it’s “bad”, but when I lose my place within the “Hail Mary”, I know I could do better when it comes to seeking God.

The adult education at my parish pushes me outside my comfort zone of prayer. And as we’ve heard – outside our comfort zone is where growth happens.

But alas – my daughter’s Monday night basketball schedule has kept me out of class for quite some time and I won’t be able to return until March. I’m finding it is way too easy to fall back inside my comfort zone and get lazy.

So I’m looking for ideas. How do you all expand your prayer life? Those of you without access to adult education at your church – where do you turn to grow in your Catholic faith?

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Praying to win the lottery… or not.

Like every other American over the age of 18 as the Powerball is stretching far past the billion dollar mark, I found myself daydreaming about what winning such a windfall would mean for me, my family, my business and quiet life here in South Dakota.

The thought process starts with the basic math… the lump sum less 40% federal tax, less at least 10% tithing (20% tithing to assuage a bit of my Catholic guilt and maybe get on God’s good side so He’d consider me when it came time for the drawing), a large lump for family, leaving us with more money than we would ever be able to (responsibly) spend in a lifetime.

Of course I dream of the impact it could have on our community… feed the hungry, elevate our schools to the mythical ivory halls of learning, wipe out parish debts. Then to thoughts of how it would benefit our parents and siblings and their families…

Then something dark started to creep in. What if they spent it wrong? What if I didn’t like how they spent it or they ended up destroying their own lives with it like so many lottery winners before? (Already it's me vs. them and "them" is people who are more precious to me than anything in the world... this line of thinking isn't going to end where I thought it would.)

Of course I am too smart to let that happen to me because my judgement is perfect and under no scenario would I ever become a penniless has-been.

But then what? What of all those other friends and a bit-more-distant relatives who I love dearly? The line needs to be drawn, somewhere, right?

I read an article featuring a lottery winner who won $30 million, and somewhere it talked about how he found out who his real friends were.

That phrase stuck with me – “real friends”.

I don’t think being a “real friend” has anything to do with it. As I think of my small circle of truly close friends, it’s difficult to predict how I would respond if one of them were to suddenly happen upon millions of dollars. I’d like to assume that I would be ecstatically overjoyed for them - without any jealousy or feelings of entitlement, but I don’t think that’s how it would go in my heart and head.

So I can’t expect from them what I wouldn’t be able to do myself. ALL my friendships would shift in ways I can't predict.

As for family, no matter what amount we gave, a bit of me would always be paranoid that someone resented the amount they received.

What about my marriage? We have a solid marriage with a rock solid foundation… but $1.4 billion strong?

And finally … my girls. Would we be able to deny them their every whim? How would we ensure they’d learn the value of hard work?

And I’m sure there are piles of troubles that I didn’t think of (or didn’t want to even bring up). But this is plenty. So much is on the line already, what more convincing do I need that $1.4 billion has no place in my life.

How many of you have spent a bit of prayer on asking for God to give you the chance to prove what a great person you would be if you won the grotesquely large jackpot? I will sheepishly admit to this too.

But the more I reflect and pray on what I’m REALLY asking for, the less appealing the jackpot becomes. Loss of priceless friends and family?

How about just a million bucks instead? I could totally live with that.

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Have you ever noticed — in artwork such as paintings, statues and sculptures — how saints are depicted with certain objects or symbols?

For example, the young St Maria Goretti holds lilies. St Teresa of Avila is usually seen with a book or pen, and a dove hovering above her. St Anthony of Padua carries the Infant Jesus and/or loaves of bread. St Therese of Lisieux is pictured with roses. St Peter the Apostle is portrayed as looking to the heavens and holding keys.

 

What were the symbols for?

You may have even noticed that some saints have similar symbols. These symbols have certain meanings, enabling those who were unable to read to understand what that saint’s story was all about.

“When Christian religious ceremonies were conducted entirely in Latin, foreign or written words were therefore inappropriate for conveying the Christian message to the majorities. However, the Catholic symbols which were adopted enabled people, who adhered to the same Catholic Christian religion, could understand the meaning of a symbol regardless of understanding the written word or whatever county they were in. The use of Catholic symbols made it possible for everyone to understand the figures and the messages which were portrayed in Christian art or in the images and objects included on stained glass windows or the actual architecture of Catholic Churches.” (Source: http://www.catholic-saints.info/catholic-symbols/)

 

Here is a list of some saints and the objects portrayed with them:

St Peter – crossed keys, symbolizing the keys to the Kingdom and his God-given authority to “bind and loose”.

St John the Apostle – a chalice, referring to what Jesus said, “Of My cup, you shall drink”.

St Paul – a book, pertaining to the epistles in the New Testament that he had written.

St Lucy, St Apollonia, St Stephen – these saints, all of whom are martyrs, are depicted with a palm branch, symbolizing the ultimate victory of life over death; palm branches are also reminiscent of Jesus being greeted with palm branches as He entered Jerusalem before His Passion.

St Maria Goretti – her white garb and white lilies refer to her purity and virginity.

St Francis of Assisi, St Mary Magdalene – they are sometimes depicted with skulls, skulls representing the meaninglessness of vanity.

St Teresa of Avila – shown with a book to show her important writings and a spear symbolizing the vision she had of an angel piercing her with a spear that set her afire with love for God.

There are many other symbols and objects attached to various saints. Aside from telling the stories of the saints, they also teach the faithful various elements and concepts of Catholicism, as well as “add mysticism to the Catholic Christian religion.” (Source: http://www.catholic-saints.info/catholic-symbols/)

 

Who are your favorite saints? What symbols and objects are portrayed with them? How do these deepen your knowledge of their exemplary lives?

Sources:

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